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Raise DC Progress Report - 2015

Aligning Actions & Connecting Resources, So All Youth Succeed.

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About Raise DC

Raise DC is a cross-sector partnership focused on improving the lives of District youth through five high-level education and workforce goals. As the District of Columbia’s comprehensive cradle-to-career initiative, Raise DC joins public, private, philanthropic, and nonprofit leaders to promote collaboration through its Leadership Council and Change Networks to provide all youth with opportunities for success through education.

Formed in 2012 and initially launched in the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education, Raise DC's high-level goals were defined by a cross-sector convening of more than 150 stakeholders. Raise DC released its first report card tracking citywide goals in February 2013. This progress report represents the first update from the baseline report card. To print the progress report in its entirety, click here

COLLECTIVE IMPACT

Raise DC’s collective impact model shifts the culture from competition over resources to collaboration among groups, organizations, and individuals who have a stake in the success of DC’s youth. Our staff and community-wide leadership promote engagement and support partners in developing deep, long-term solutions by building a sustained movement, guided by a set of shared educational outcomes. 

Raise DC is a member of the StriveTogether Partnership—an organization of more than 60 communities that use collective impact to improve outcomes for youth. Each Partnership is committed to a shared community vision, evidence-based decision-making, collaborative action, and investment and sustainability. Raise DC has been recognized as one of Strive’s “Emerging” Partnerships.

RAISE DC'S ROAD TO COLLECTIVE IMPACT

Our Mission

OUR FIVE GOALS

Raise DC brings together cross-sector partners in the District to focus on our five cradle-to-career goals in education and workforce:

1. Every child is prepared for kindergarten

2. Every child graduates from high school

3. Every youth who is not in school reconnects to education/training

4. Every youth attains a postsecondary credential

5. Every youth is prepared for a career

Moving Forward: An Introduction

A Letter from our Executive Director

Raise DC was formed to bring together public, private, philanthropic, and nonprofit leaders to collectively impact DC children and youth in five key educational and workforce issue areas. While housed in the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education, more than 150 stakeholders convened to create Raise DC's high-level goals that focus on strengthening the lives of young people in the District from cradle to career.

In 2013, we released our baseline report card—the first aggregated look at citywide educational data tied to our specific goals. It defined metrics to track the system-wide success of young people ages 0-24 as they transition from birth, through school, and into careers.

When Raise DC was created, our members and partners knew that efforts to develop an educational road map had been tried before and that some would be skeptical that this partnership would be different. However, through intentional cross-sector collaborations, a focus on shared outcomes, and keen attention to the data, Raise DC laid the groundwork for a sustainable movement, and we're excited about where this will take us.

We recognize that collecting reliable data is a difficult endeavor, which is precisely where our charge originated. Reviewing this data allows us to take stock of where we are and determine which levers will bring the greatest impact moving forward.

We are proud of the work accomplished—as a city—that is reflected in the data of this Raise DC Progress Report: more of our metrics are moving in the right direction than not. While the District has made some early strides, the report also highlights areas where we need to further focus our efforts and resources. For example, our citywide high school graduation rate remains at 61%, and we don't yet have a cohesive way to measure kindergarten readiness. These are two areas at the top of our agenda.

As an organization, we are encouraged by the milestones we've reached on the road to making a collective impact on outcomes in the District. We have transitioned out of the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education to become an independent nonprofit partnership, now housed by The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region. Collectively, our Change Networks have been instrumental in creating expanded sharing of data and resources around educational outcomes. We have ignited a citywide focus on creating pathways to second-chance educational opportunities. We provided strong support for the successful launch and operation of DC's first ReEngagement Center. And we have generated strength in numbers: 32 Leadership Council members; more than 150 organizations, schools, agencies, and companies participating in one of our Change Networks; and five full-time, dedicated staff.

Raise DC is in it for the long haul for the District's children and youth. Over the next year, our internal focus will be on creating stronger supports for the networks and organizations that are using newly accessible data for continuous improvement. With stronger networks, we expect to have more explicit data on the impact each network is making within its goal areas. We will extend the reach of our Change Networks to include additional focus on school readiness and 3rd grade literacy. We will continue to grow our networks focused on high school graduation, re-engaging youth, college and credential completion, and youth employment.

This progress report serves as a reminder that there is still much work to be done. We know that the long-term commitment and dedication each of us brings to this collective work is what will generate the needle-moving improvements we are focused on making for our children and youth. Together, we will continue to raise DC.

Laurie Wingate

Executive Director, Raise DC

How to Read this Report

INDICATOR CARDS EXPLAINED

UPDATED BASELINE METRICS EXPLAINED

Throughout this report, you will see instances where, for one reason or another, the progress report contains an updated or new baseline metric. Where there is an Updated Baseline, we were able to retroactively calculate the baseline metric for comparison purposes, and there is an accurate "% change" based on the updated baseline. Where there is a New Baseline, we were unable to retroactively calculate the baseline metric for comparison purposes, and there is an "N/A" where the change should be.

Whenever you see an asterisk next to a baseline number, this indicates the baseline is either updated or new. The indicator's narrative explains the reason for the change. For more details around the change (including the original baseline number), reference the Data Dictionary.

UPDATED BASELINE SCENARIOS

In general, the reasons for an updated baseline fall into the following three categories:

1.  Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. In some scenarios, we now have cleaner or better data (from the same source) for a metric than was previously available. For example, for disconnected youth, we’ve been tracking students who exit school without indicating enrollment in another educational institution. We are now able to identify students who leave school because they left the state and can remove them from this count, which was not the case in the 2013 baseline report card.

2.  Updated Baseline due to a change in the data source. In some scenarios, we need to change the data source for a metric. For example, the source originally used to measure disconnected youth was based on census data. While this method provides a snapshot, it is difficult to make year-over-year comparisons due to small sample sizes and large margins of error. We have changed the data source in this scenario so that we can make year-over-year comparisons going forward.

3.  Updated Baseline due to a change in locally accepted definition of a metric. In some scenarios, the District's universally accepted definition of a metric has changed. To maintain our commitment to tracking metrics that are population-based and reasonably similar across the community, we have adopted the new definition of these metrics.

A NOTE ABOUT OUR INDICATORS

There are many factors that influence the educational success of our children and youth. Raise DC has identified three levels of indicators to guide the work and is collecting data for each. Core and contributing indicators are tracked in the report to provide an overall snapshot of progress toward Raise DC goals. Additional data related to the core and contributing indicators is tracked and analyzed within the Raise DC Change Networks to drive their collaborative action plans. This guide was developed for the baseline report card and has been used going forward.

INDICATOR SELECTION

At its launch, more than 150 stakeholders engaged in an extensive process to select the community-wide indicators that Raise DC would track. Raise DC worked closely with the Leadership Council, Change Network members, issue experts, the Urban Institute, and the Raise DC Data Committee to define indicators that would lay the foundation for the District's collective work. These indicators were carefully selected in alignment with work that was already underway and will continue to provide a comprehensive and honest picture of progress over time.

The criteria for indicator selection required that indicators be:
  • Population-based, representing conditions at the citywide/community level and not at the programmatic level
  • Valid measures of concepts outlined in the success road map and produced by a trusted source
  • Easily understandable to local stakeholders
  • Equivalent or reasonably similar across local education agencies' (LEAs') systems/providers, enabling cross-sector comparisons
  • Affordable to gather and report and available consistently over time
  • Changeable to a significant degree by local action and useful in the day-to-day work of organizations and networks working to improve outcomes for children and youth

These criteria allowed Raise DC to arrive at indicators that were ample but imperfect. Much like our work, the data that is available and relevant fluctuates over time. As a result, going forward, Raise DC's Data Committee will work with the various Change Networks to create a vetting process for determining indicators that need to be added, adjusted, or removed.

PROGRESS REPORT FLOW

The progress report is divided into sections that represent Raise DC’s five high-level goals. Each section includes a narrative on how the Change Networks are acting on these cradle-to-career goals, followed by the core and contributing data indicators around each goal, and closing with a spotlight on how members are using the data to make an impact.

1. EARLY CHILDHOOD

OUR GOAL

To increase the percentage of children entering kindergarten ready to learn.

WHO WE ARE

The Early Childhood Change Network (ECCN) includes stakeholders within the government, nonprofit, and healthcare sectors, ensuring a diverse approach to improving kindergarten readiness.

WHAT WE'RE DOING

Full childhood developmental screenings—consisting of several measures that form a holistic picture—are one of a healthcare provider’s best tools for flagging issues early on and ensuring children receive the necessary support to prepare them for kindergarten and beyond. However, a comprehensive view for screenings is currently impossible.

One of the ECCN's first charges was to map communication paths for providers who conduct developmental delay screenings, in order to better understand the variety of possible screening settings.

The ECCN will analyze how young children are developing through the use of the Early Development Instrument (EDI), a population-based measure of school readiness developed by the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE). This data can be used to predict health, education, and social outcomes and to guide local community efforts to help children reach health and readiness benchmarks to succeed in school.

WHAT'S NEXT

In partnership with the State Early Childhood Development Coordinating Council and the Office of the State Superintendent of Education, the ECCN will help analyze the EDI data collected and present the information generated by geographic areas to engage the community in creating action plans for children in particular neighborhoods, guide planning and program development within schools, and inform resource allocation decisions. 

The District began implementing EDI in late spring 2015 and will continue to roll it out with a second administration in January 2016. Raise DC will use data collected over the next two years to motivate actions and advocacy efforts, support the planning of interventions and resource investments, and track progress over time to see how changes in investments, policies, or other factors influence the health and well-being of children.

~ Data: Early Childhood

A NOTE ABOUT THE DATA

For information about how to read the data that follows, please visit the "How to Read this Report" page at the beginning of this report. For details pertaining to data definitions, sources, raw numbers, and notes, please visit the "Data Dictionary" page at the end of this report.

CORE INDICATORS

Raise DC's first goal is to ensure that every child is prepared for kindergarten, which is to be achieved by increasing the percentage of children entering kindergarten ready to learn. While individual schools and providers work toward this goal daily, there is currently no common measure for the core indicator: Percentage of Children Entering Kindergarten Meeting Expected Benchmarks in Multiple Domains. As a national leader in achieving universal pre-kindergarten (pre-K), the District must build on this momentum by ensuring our children enter kindergarten ready to succeed. The Early Childhood Change Network's (ECCN's) collaboration with the State Early Childhood Development Coordinating Council and Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to implement the Early Development Instrument (EDI) will help to bring us one step closer to a common set of success benchmarks.

CONTRIBUTING INDICATORS

Lead Pre-K Teachers with a Bachelor's Degree

OSSE SY2012-13 (1.01)
99%
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A note about measuring "high-quality" early childhood education development programs: At the time of publication for Raise DC's baseline report card, there was no metric to universally measure high-quality early childhood education programs. Nonetheless, the following indicators are imperfect and incomparable across sectors but reflect the baseline report card definitions for purposes of maintaining consistency. Redefining the indicators and data sources used for the reports will be the charge of Raise DC's Data Committee in fall 2015. One potential source to measure quality universally across community-based organizations (CBOs), DC Public Schools (DCPS), and public charter schools would be the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS).

High-Quality Early Childhood Education Development Programs - CBOs (Ages 0-5)

OSSE SY2013-14 (1.02a)
37%
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Community-Based Organizations: This indicator defines "high-quality" as accredited and subsidized early childhood CBOs successfully attaining "gold" tier status. Over the last two years, OSSE has offered incentives to pay for accreditation and to support CBOs through the application process, which is reflected in the 7% increase of high-quality programs.

High-Quality Early Childhood Education Development Programs - DCPS (Ages 3-5)

DCPS SY2013-14 (1.02b)
86%
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DC Public Schools: This indicator defines "high-quality" as classrooms that meet Head Start (Title I) Standards or are accredited by the American Montessori Association. That is not to say, however, that Head Start & Montessori classrooms are the only indicators of high-quality early childhood programs. DCPS currently requires that all schools ensure programs that reflect evidence-based curricula.

The slight decrease in high-quality programs is the result of the increase in the percent of non-Title I classrooms. These classrooms are not required to meet the same Head Start standards of quality and are, therefore, not considered high quality according to this definition. In other words, the numerator remained the same, while the denominator increased.

Public Charter Schools: The Public Charter School Board (PCSB) published individual early childhood school scorecards in SY2013-14, reporting on student performance, CLASS, attendance, and re-enrollment. This pilot framework was not tiered, and PCSB is working to develop a tiered framework in coming years. PCSB monitors its individual performance on these goals annually, but all public charter schools have unique goals for their early childhood programs, which poses challenges in collecting aggregate-level data.


Births with Early Prenatal Care

DOH 2013 (1.03)
66%
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The downward trend may be understood partly as an increase in the robustness of the data. Over time, the number of records with unknown prenatal care (excluded from this calculation) has decreased, increasing the percent of the population represented by this metric. In other words, the shift is likely a result of having better data about mothers who are or are not receiving prenatal care, rather than as a result of fewer mothers actually receiving prenatal care.

Children (Ages 3-5) Receiving Early Screening for Developmental Delays

DCPS FY2014 (1.04)
24%
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Updated Baseline due to a change in the data source. This metric originally represented "Children (Ages 0-5) Receiving Early Screening for Developmental Delays" and combined data from OSSE's Strong Start (ages 0-3) program with DCPS' Early Stages (ages 3-5) program. This metric now represents ONLY the Early Stages (ages 3-5) piece of this indicator, and does NOT include the Strong Start (ages 0-3) piece of this indicator.** 

It is important to note that there is no central system for tracking the percentage of all children receiving early screening for developmental delays. The above metric represents only one source of data for children receiving developmental screenings and includes children ages 3-5 who attend DCPS' Early Stages program. It does not reflect the many other screenings that occur in doctors' offices, schools, and CBOs.

Focusing attention on this metric is the first step toward changing practice and ensuring that all youth in the District have access to the appropriate developmental supports. The work of the Department of Health Care Finance and the ECCN to emphasize tracking developmental delays in Medicaid billing will bring us one step closer to understanding how many children receive such screenings. We expect to baseline this more robust metric in FY16.


Children (Ages 0-5) with a Medical Home (Medicaid Enrollment)

Medicaid FY2013 (1.05)
66%
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Health coverage through Medicaid provides families with young children with access to medical care and serves as a proxy for a medical home. While Medicaid enrollment is a suitable measure of children with access to medical care, it does not measure any child health wellness outcomes. Raise DC's Data Committee will explore other metrics that may better track child health outcomes.

Children (Ages 0-5) Receiving Health Screenings

Medicaid FY2013 (1.06)
77%
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This metric only covers children enrolled in Medicaid and is inclusive of public health coverage. These children enrolled in Medicaid receive "well-child visits" or comprehensive evaluations of a child's physical, oral, and developmental health.

** Part C of IDEA (the portion of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that pertains to children ages 0-3) was reauthorized in 2011, requiring states to provide parents with prior written notice for screening as part of the initial federally mandated 45-day evaluation timeline. The adoption of this requirement by the District would have severely impacted federal compliance of 100% timeliness. Effective July 1, 2012, all children initially referred to the District's Part C program suspected of developmental delay receive an evaluation.

​~ Spotlight: Early Childhood

ECCN MEMBER ACTS ON COMPLETE SCREENINGS TO ENSURE CHILD READINESS

Full childhood developmental screenings are critical in determining the supports that a child needs to be prepared for kindergarten. Developmental screenings currently occur in a variety of locations, but there is no centralized way to ensure that every child has been screened. The DC Department of Health Care Finance, an Early Childhood Change Network (ECCN) member, took action to address the challenge of determining if children had received screenings for developmental delays. 

The Department successfully changed Medicaid billing instructions to break out codes for each screening component into separately billable items. This change encourages healthcare providers to perform childhood developmental screenings by incentivizing them with a small monetary increase for the new billing practice (along with other well-child visit screenings). It also provides a significant opportunity for the District to track implementation and ensures all children are being screened appropriately. The ability to track this data is integral to moving the needle for children with developmental delays.

In order to promote the change, the DC Department of Health Care Finance has conducted provider trainings and targeted outreach, which it hopes will lead to more diagnostic services and treatment for children. This push corresponds to ECCN work to emphasize the significance of these screenings, and Raise DC hopes to be able to baseline this data in FY2016.

2. SCHOOL SUCCESS

OUR GOAL

To increase the percentage of youth who graduate from high school on time and are college/career ready.

WHO WE ARE

Currently, this network is comprised of DC Public Schools (DCPS), DC Public Charter School Board (PCSB), the Deputy Mayor for Education (DME), the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), school-based leaders, and government agencies, with a unifying focus on creating stronger graduation pathways for District students.

WHAT WE'RE DOING

Through the Graduation Pathways Project, the DME, OSSE, DCPS, PCSB, and individual public charters collaborated to conduct DC’s first detailed assessment of our citywide high school graduation rate, including:

  • Distinguishing key 8th grade factors that are highly predictive of students not graduating,
  • Determining schools that are “beating the odds” and changing graduation outcomes for various student subgroups, and
  • Defining segments of high school students based on patterns of disengagement and related graduation outcomes.

In September 2014, these report findings were publicly released at the Graduation Pathways Summit. The convening catalyzed local systems-level and school-based leaders around a common set of data and set the stage for a collective effort to drive improvements in key high-impact areas. To date, these areas include:

  1. Fortifying students’ transitions from 8th through 9th grade,
  2. Implementing more flexible paths to graduation, and
  3. Designing, aligning, and expanding the supply of "seats" to better serve "off-track" students and dropouts.

WHAT'S NEXT

In response to the Graduation Pathways Report findings and building upon the work of the District’s newly launched youth  ReEngagement Center, Raise DC is supporting a collaborative effort among the DME, OSSE, DCPS, PCSB, and charter school local education agencies to align and expand the landscape of educational options that serve “off-track” students and dropouts. 

The following graph from the Graduation Pathways Report provides a snapshot of the critical need to build out multiple pathways to graduation, particularly for students who are far off track. Among the students represented from one cohort who dropped out of school, the vast majority are older than age 18 and accumulated 10 or fewer of the 24 credits required to graduate from high school.

Additionally, the Graduation Pathways Report highlighted that roughly 25% of all high school students are immediately disengaged by the end of their first year of high school. On average, these students earned only two credits, and 78% of them eventually dropped out of high school. 

This collective effort aims to ensure that every student in the District—no matter how far off track they may be—has a path to graduation.

~ Data: School Success

A NOTE ABOUT THE DATA

For information about how to read the data that follows, please visit the  "How to Read this Report" page at the beginning of this report. For details pertaining to data definitions, sources, raw numbers, and notes, please visit the "Data Dictionary" page at the end of this report.

CORE INDICATORS 

The District tracks its graduation rate using the federal "cohort" model (the Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate, or ACGR), which calculates the number of students in DC Public Schools (DCPS) and public charter schools who graduate within four years of first entering high school. The most recent national four-year high school rate, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, is 81%.

While the Four-Year ACGR is the national standard, Raise DC and its partner recognize that a "one-size-fits-all" approach does not best meet the needs of all students and, thus, supports measuring (and will track in the report) the five-year graduation rate to acknowledge all students who have graduated from high school.

High School Graduation - Four-Year ACGR

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.0a)
61%
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High School Graduation - Five-Year ACGR

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.0b)
68%
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The Value of the Five-Year Graduation Rate

The following graph represents graduation outcomes for youth who were freshmen in SY2009-10. The solid blue line represents youth who graduated in four years, and the dashed blue line represents youth who graduated in five years. A large gap between the four-year and five-year graduation rates for a particular subgroup indicates that this subgroup benefits significantly (in terms of graduation outcomes) from a fifth year of high school.

The Graduation Pathways Report highlighted the importance of the five-year graduation rate, as well. The graph to the right plots the age and total credits accumulated for youth who did not graduate high school in four years but who did re-enroll the following fall for a fifth year in high school. A full 15% of students in this group are close to graduation. The total number of credits remaining is such that a high school diploma is attainable with an additional year of high school.


Graduation Rates Disaggregated

The following represents the movement of the ACGR over the last three years, disaggregated in a variety of ways.

ACGR by Race - The first graph represents ACGR disaggregated by race, with the gray line denoting the state average. The "other" population was not large enough to report ACGR in SY2011-12; therefore, the dashed blue line begins in SY2012-13. Click on the graph to expand.



ACGR by Gender -
The second graph represents ACGR disaggregated by gender, with the gray line denoting the state average. Although the male graduation rate has improved slightly over the last three years, a major gap between the graduation rate for each gender remains. Click on the graph to expand.

ACGR by Sector - The third graph represents ACGR disaggregated by sector—DC Public Schools (DCPS) and public charter schools—with the gray line denoting the state average. Click on the graph to expand.



ACGR by Additional Subgroups -
The final graph represents ACGR disaggregated by additional subgroups, with the gray line denoting the state average. These subgroups include: economic disadvantage (students who are eligible for free/reduced meals), English Language Learners (ELL), and students who receive Special Education services (SPED). Click on the graph to expand.


Overall Reading Proficiency - DCCAS

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.0c)
50%
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Overall Math Proficiency - DCCAS

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.0d)
55%
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In SY2014-15, both DCPS and public charter schools began administering PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers) instead of DCCAS (DC Comprehensive Assessment System). While this new set of math and English assessments, based on Common Core, will allow us to know how District students are performing compared to their national peers, it will be an entirely new measurement of student proficiency and will, therefore, not be directly comparable to DCCAS scores. We will baseline the new PARCC assessments in our next report.

CONTRIBUTING INDICATORS

3rd Grade Reading Proficiency - DCCAS

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.01)
44%
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3rd Grade Math Proficiency - DCCAS

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.02)
47%
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8th Grade Reading Proficiency - DCCAS

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.03)
54%
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8th Grade Math Proficiency - DCCAS

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.04)
65%
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9th to 10th Grade Promotion

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.05)
79%
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Updated Baseline due to improved data collection. Note that this metric excludes students who attend nontraditional (alternative and adult) schools, includes only students who appear in both the SY2012-13 and SY2013-14 enrollment audit, and represents all SY2012-13 9th graders as the denominator. 


Truancy

OSSE (2.06)
N/A
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There will be a New Baseline as a result of new regulations that impacted the definition of being "present" in school, as well as the fact that, to date, there has not been a consistently applied cross-sector definition of "truancy". The Truancy Taskforce, convened by the Deputy Mayor for Education (DME) and Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services and including the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), DCPS, and the Public Charter School Board (PCSB) as members, is working to agree upon and recommend a single, cross-sector definition of truancy to be measured by OSSE. The Truancy Taskforce expects to make its recommendation by fall 2015, and this report will reflect this definition moving forward.


Suspensions

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.07)
11%
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Expulsions

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.08)
.16%
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Updated Baseline for both disciplinary indicators, due to a change in the data source. At the time of the baseline report card's publication, the only publicly available cross-sector discipline data was limited to federal reporting (disciplinary action related to drugs, alcohol, weapons, or violence). Shortly after the release of the baseline report card, the DME, OSSE, DCPS, PCSB, and NewSchools Venture Fund partnered to create the city's first Equity Reports, with the intent of ensuring equity by making data transparent and comparable. It is from these Equity Reports that we are now able to compare all disciplinary data (not just data limited to federal guidelines) across sectors.

Note that each local education agency (LEA) creates its own policy for determining appropriate disciplinary action. The charter sector does not currently have a designated alternative school to transfer middle or high school students for long-term disciplinary reasons. DCPS schools have adopted a discipline code that only allows for expulsion in extreme cases, such as incidents of extreme violence such as attacking a student or staff member. DCPS schools do have the option of transferring a middle or high school student to an alternative school for disciplinary reasons, and these transfers are not counted as expulsions.


In-Seat Attendance

OSSE SY2013-14 (2.09)
90%
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New Baseline, as OSSE began collecting attendance data in SY2012-13. "In-Seat Attendance" is the rate at which students are present at school. Any absence, whether excused or unexcused, counts against this number. Different schools have different standards for what counts as an excused absence.

~ Spotlight: School Success

CORE SCHOOLS GROUP USES DATA TO FOSTER COLLABORATION

In response to a charge from Raise DC’s Leadership Council in 2013 to examine the District’s low high school graduation rate, the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education spearheaded the collection and analysis of an unprecedented data set, highlighting granular information on the state of high school outcomes. In 2014, these findings were published in the Graduation Pathways Report. The findings provided Raise DC partners with a shared foundation of knowledge from which to build a road map of opportunities to strengthen pipelines to high school completion.

In January 2015, Raise DC launched its “Core Schools Group”—a cohort of local school-based leaders motivated to use the Graduation Pathways Report data to drive organizational change within their own campuses. Comprised of a mix of middle and high schools from both DCPS and the public charter school sector, this group is honing in on the critical transition point between 8th and 9th grades. By defining “pipelines” of students who transition from participating middle schools to participating high schools, these schools are collaborating to share critical student information, engaging in cross-school partnership activities, and developing a shared “9th grade ready” list that articulates key skills and competencies rising 9th graders will need to succeed in high school. 

This group also seeks to serve as a feedback loop to systems-level leaders, highlighting key policy and planning opportunities to accelerate change and build scalable efforts within DC schools. A core policy area of focus is supporting the development of greater high school credit flexibility. Awarding students course credit based on mastering content, rather than the number of hours in a course, will help ensure that “off-track” students have viable opportunities to attain high school diplomas.

While the Core Schools Group is setting the agenda for future collaborative work, Graduation Pathways Report data has already resulted in more focused efforts for individual schools:

The data in the Graduation Pathways Report was extremely informative and helped us look at our many successes but also underscore the importance of increasing early interventions. Much of my work has centered around supports to students in their senior year and beyond; but persistent gaps in foundational skills, both academic and non-academic, suggested that we needed to redouble our early efforts to better support the successful transition to college. The report challenged our team to shift more of our focus to early interventions beginning in middle school and in the early stages of high school. As a result, we have started to develop stronger programming with our feeder schools. The early warning indicators and data outlined in the report provided really good insight around areas to be monitored.”

– Ashref Elshazli, Friendship Schools, a Core Schools Group member 


3. DISCONNECTED YOUTH

OUR GOAL

To decrease the percentage of youth who are disconnected from both school and work.

WHO WE ARE

The Disconnected Youth Change Network (DYCN) consists of community-based organizations, government agencies, funders, and alternative and adult learning institutions dedicated to creating and providing reengagement opportunities for youth who are not currently enrolled in an education or training program.

WHAT WE'RE DOING

DYCN members provided the foundational technical, research, and advocacy support to advance the Deputy Mayor for Education and Office of the State Superintendent of Education's (OSSE's) launch of the District's first youth ReEngagement Center (REC). The DYCN now serves as the external advisory committee to the REC. Staffed with a team of youth specialists and managed by OSSE, the REC is DC’s marquee resource for providing out-of-school youth with opportunities to enroll in education programs and connect to a variety of supportive wraparound services that will help them pursue and complete high school credentials, putting them on the path to future career success.   

With the help of the DC Alliance for Youth Advocates, DYCN members have also collectively advocated for policy changes related to the expansion of transportation subsidies and for policies that create more flexible pathways to achieving a high school diploma. Additionally, DYCN members developed a resource guide that catalogs the providers and services in the city that serve disconnected youth.

WHAT'S NEXT

In partnership with the Youth Employment Change Network, DYCN is now turning its attention to launching a virtual reconnection platform to serve as a companion to the physical ReEngagement Center. This platform will be a critical tool to help on-the-ground partners and families understand the variety of program options available for disengaged youth seeking to reconnect back to successful pathways.

Harnessing the myriad of youth-focused institutions from around the District, DYCN is also launching an effort to define, collect, and analyze valuable data related to one of the city’s most difficult-to-track populations. The ability to clearly define DYCN’s collective impact, highlight and scale effective practices, and collaborate with similar organizations to advance a shared policy agenda will assist DYCN members in achieving their shared goal. 

~ Data: Disconnected Youth

A NOTE ABOUT THE DATA

It is important to note that “disconnected youth” is a particularly difficult metric to both define and track. As a community, we have, for example, several directionally accurate but imperfect measures of “disconnected youth” and their various “re-engagement” points (secondary, postsecondary, and employment). These metrics represent snapshots in time from a variety of sources with different denominators. Therefore, conclusions cannot and should not be drawn among these metrics. 

These population-level metrics are to be used as a temperature test and directional measure for year-over-year comparison. They represent our “north star” metrics—the big numbers we’re chipping away at as a community. At the same time, the Disconnected Youth Data Sharing Initiative will provide a clearer and more nuanced picture of the outcomes for youth that Raise DC member organizations influence daily. 


For information about how to read the data that follows, please visit the "How to Read this Report" page at the beginning of this report. For details pertaining to data definitions, sources, raw numbers, and notes, please visit the "Data Dictionary" page at the end of this report.

CORE INDICATORS

There are several accepted definitions to capture this population of youth; Raise DC measures two of these definitions. The infographic below depicts the differences between these two definitions.

Disconnected Youth (Ages 16-24)

ACS 2010-2012 (3.0a)
9%
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New Baseline due to a change in the data source. The new baseline uses three-year American Community Survey (ACS) data, permitting greater confidence in our measurements. Three-year estimates pool multiple years of ACS data, essentially tripling the sample sizes, allowing researchers to make more accurate comparisons among data (such as the disconnected youth population in DC). From this point forward, Raise DC will track the "disconnected youth" metric every three years, upon the release of a new set of pooled census data.

It is important to measure this indicator (even though it will only be every three years), as the issue of disconnected youth—broadly defined as those ages 16-24 who are not working and not in school—is a recognized policy problem, both locally and nationally. The national disconnected youth rate (using the same source and business rules) for youth ages 16-24 is 8%. 


Educationally Disengaged Youth (Ages 16-24)

OSSE/SLED SY2012-13 (3.0b)
14%
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New Baseline to enable year-over-year comparisons and to identify the Disconnected Youth Change Network's (DYCN's) progress with reconnecting youth to educational opportunities toward attainment of a secondary credential (HS diploma or GED). The DYCN plans to track outcomes for "educationally disengaged" youth with the help of the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), in coordination with DC's ReEngagement Center efforts.

CONTRIBUTING INDICATORS

DC Public or Public Charter School Exits (Ages 16-24)

OSSE/SLED SY2012-13 (3.01)
9%
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Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. As a result of the Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate (ACGR) process, we are able to identify students who leave school because they leave the state, and we can remove them from this count. 

This indicator measures the percentage of youth who have exited a DC public or public charter school (either during the given school year or during the summer prior) without verifying enrollment in another educational program.


Out-of-School Youth - Secondary Reconnection (Ages 16-24)

OSSE/SLED SY2012-13 (3.02)
1304
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Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. We are now able to distinguish "formerly educationally disengaged youth" from those who directly enroll in alternative or adult programs from traditional high schools. The previous metric captured all students enrolled in adult and alternative programs.

Note that since OSSE is unable to determine the number of youth who were previously educationally disengaged as of SY2011-12, we are unable to represent the baseline for this indicator as a percentage.

This indicator measures the number of formerly educationally disengaged youth who have reconnected to a secondary education program (this includes public schools, public charter schools, alternative programs, adult programs, or community-based organizations).


Out-of-School Youth - Postsecondary Reconnection (Ages 16-24)

OSSE/SLED SY2012-13 (3.03)
683
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Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. We are now able to identify how many "formerly educationally disengaged youth" then re-enroll in postsecondary educational institutions in a given academic year.

Note that since OSSE is unable to determine the number of youth who were previously educationally disengaged as of SY2011-12, we are unable to represent the baseline for this indicator as a percentage.


Out-of-School Youth - Employment Training (Ages 16-24)

DOES 2014 (3.04)
343
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Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. The original baseline for this indicator included programs that could not necessarily be disaggregated by out-of-school youth. It is important to note that this number does not represent all of the out-of-school youth in employment training programs throughout the District. This number includes a variety of employment training programs captured by the Department of Employment Services. These programs fluctuate year over year, making it a challenge to provide consistent comparison. While there are a variety of community-based programs that provide employment training for out-of-school youth, there is no common repository that captures this information.

~ Spotlight: Disconnected Youth

REENGAGEMENT CENTER REMOVES BARRIERS TO HIGH SCHOOL ATTAINMENT

Bolstered by the Deputy Mayor for Education’s (DME’s) heightened focus on reconnection and the incorporation of improving outcomes for disconnected youth as one of Raise DC’s five citywide goals, the Disconnected Youth Change Network (DYCN) became the first sustained gathering of members from multiple sectors around this issue. Over the next two years, DYCN members provided multilayered support to DME and the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to bring the ReEngagement Center to life.

As the result of years of research, strategic planning, collaboration, and advocacy, Washington, DC’s first ReEngagement Center (REC) launched in October 2014. Within its first nine months, REC staff have connected with more than 300 dropouts (ages 16-24), more than 150 of whom have successfully reenrolled back to a school or GED program, and six of whom have already graduated.

Managed by OSSE, the REC helps youth who have dropped out to reconnect back to educational options and other critical services to support their attainment of a high school diploma or GED. Establishing one-on-one relationships with the young people they serve, ReEngagement Specialists work diligently to remove a variety of barriers that keep youth from educational success—such as connecting eligible youth to needed transportation supports, childcare options, employment opportunities, and public benefits such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). The REC staff also fully support the re-enrollment process, from collecting transcripts to accompanying youth on school site visits, and staff provide at least one year of case management post-enrollment.

The REC uses a multitude of outreach channels to target dropouts, including mailings to a list of identified disengaged youth, door-to-door canvassing, Summer Youth Employment street teams to engage with homeless youth, and traditional marketing campaigns. Outreach also includes referral partnerships with naturally aligned partners, including the Metropolitan Police Department, the Department of Human Services, District courts, the District’s juvenile justice agencies, the Department of Employment Services, and multiple community- and faith-based organizations that work with youth in the District. Together, these partners are offering a positive route back to a successful pathway.

4. COLLEGE & CREDENTIAL COMPLETION

OUR GOAL

To increase the percentage of youth who attain a college degree or industry-recognized license/certification.

WHO WE ARE

Housed in the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), the College and Credential Completion Network (C3N) brings together more than 120 local college access programs, government agencies, community-based organizations, and institutions of higher learning.

WHAT WE'RE DOING

C3N has a range of initiatives targeting key indicators for postsecondary attainment, including readiness, enrollment, and persistence, as well as systems for the sharing of best practices around college access and success. To improve postsecondary readiness, C3N’s Data Sharing Initiative utilizes OSSE's Statewide Longitudinal Education Data System (SLED) to give nonprofit service providers unprecedented and crucial student-level data and analysis, imparting the insight needed to improve programming and service-impact. To increase postsecondary enrollment, C3N’s newest initiative aims to increase the District’s rate of FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) completion through a public awareness campaign, the creation of a student-level FAFSA data portal for high school staff, and FAFSA submission events. Supplementing these efforts, C3N members may share and acquire best practices through the network’s Counselor Professional Development Program and monthly roundtables, allowing for greater intra-network programmatic alignment.

WHAT'S NEXT

To help youth make more informed college choices and increase both postsecondary persistence and completion, C3N has partnered with the Education Advisory Board to create My College Fact Finder, a web-based college guide with DC-specific postsecondary access and success data. Complementing the network’s efforts around FAFSA completion, the new Summer Transition Workshop series seeks to further improve the college enrollment metric by providing college-bound students essential information on transitioning successfully to college. Additionally, to focus on the postsecondary persistence outcome, C3N will convene a working group charged with creating a network initiative around improving postsecondary persistence, to be implemented in SY2016-17. C3N has also partnered with the Disconnected Youth Change Network and the Youth Employment Change Network in a three-year project through a grant from Lumina Foundation focused on college attainment for the disconnected youth population. Finally, C3N is contributing to the development of the C3 Ready Competencies, the College Readiness Metrics, and the Adult College Completion, all of which are initiatives of OSSE. 

~ Data: College & Credential Completion

A NOTE ABOUT THE DATA

The following metrics have several updated baselines due to new and improved data collection, along with the application of new business rules. Since the release of the baseline report card in 2013, the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) has been able to glean deeper insights into DC students’ college-going behavior by using the Statewide Longitudinal Education Data System, in tandem with data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC). Along with employing this newly negotiated methodology, it is also important to note that the NSC’s data is continuously updated by new college enrollment records and often experiences a lag in reporting from member institutions. Therefore, exact percentages may retroactively change and can vary slightly from year to year as reporting to and participation in the NSC improves nationally.

For information about how to read the data that follows, please visit the "How to Read this Report" page at the beginning of this report. For details pertaining to data definitions, sources, raw numbers, and notes, please visit the "Data Dictionary" page at the end of this report.

CORE INDICATORS

Three-Year Associate's Degree Attainment (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)

OSSE/NSC SY2010-11 (4.0a)
2%
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Six-Year Bachelor's Degree Attainment (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)

OSSE/NSC SY2007-08 (4.0b)
43%
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In the postsecondary sector, it is standard to look at "time-and-a-half" when measuring completion rates. It is for this reason that Raise DC measures six-year bachelor's degree attainment and three-year associate's degree attainment. The most recent national six-year bachelor's degree attainment rate, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, is 59%. 

Please note that SY2007-08 represents the first school year with clean and robust data for all graduating high school seniors in the District. As such, that school year represents first cohort of seniors who we can use for "Six-Year Bachelor's Degree Attainment" and is, therefore, the baseline year.

It is also important to note that the denominator for all of the postsecondary indicators represents DC youth who are high school graduates, not all DC youth. The graph below demonstrates the relationship between high school cohorts and postsecondary enrollment. This graph utilizes data from the Graduation Pathways Report and pools four cohorts of students who were first-time 9th graders between 2009 and 2013.


Two-Year UDC-CC Certificate Completion (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)

UDC-CC FY2014 (4.0c)
61%
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The University of DC Community College (UDC-CC) Division of Workforce Development & Lifelong Learning (WDLL) uses a holistic approach to student success as students progress through and complete their college experience. The student success initiative is rooted in three pillars: building community, promoting feedback loops, and facilitating student transitions. As a student moves through a career pathway, WDLL offers continued development opportunities outside of the traditional classroom setting, such as financial literacy, resume writing, stress management, and test-taking tips. WDLL also offers transition services for those students interested in completing or attaining two- or four-year degrees, as well as retention services for those needing wraparound services not offered by the University. This initiative has resulted in an increase in completion from just over 50% to 73% (for all ages) and from 56% to 61% (for youth ages 24 and under). 

CONTRIBUTING INDICATORS


Postsecondary Enrollment - Six Months (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)

OSSE/NSC SY2011-12 (4.01a)
50%
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Postsecondary Enrollment - 12 Months (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)

OSSE/NSC SY2011-12 (4.01b)
54%
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Postsecondary Enrollment - 18 Months (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)

OSSE/NSC SY2011-12 (4.01c)
60%
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Postsecondary Persistence - First to Second Year (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)

OSSE/NSC SY2011-12 (4.02)
74%
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As a reminder, several of the postsecondary indicators have an updated baseline. Please see the above "note about the data" for further details around the updates.


FAFSA Completion (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)

OSSE (4.03a)
N/A
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New Baseline due to a change in the data source. OSSE is now able to track longitudinal data for Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) completion, but this will not be finalized until late summer 2015 (when the FAFSA is due). Baseline will be set next year.


DCTAG One App Completion (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)

OSSE SY2013-14 (4.03b)
62%
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Updated Baseline due to a change in the business rules. This metric now uses all certified high school graduates for the denominator. 

~ Spotlight: College & Credential Completion

DATA SHARING INITIATIVE BENEFITS FUTURE COLLEGE STUDENTS

Through the Data Sharing Initiative bolstered by C3N, more than 20 college access providers have come together to share student information such as demographic data, standardized test scores, and academic indicators in a more coordinated way. As a result, thousands of youth have been positively impacted by this streamlined process.

The Data Sharing Initiative has been essential for nonprofits such as For Love of Children (FLOC), an organization that provides free educational services outside of the classroom. By using data shared through the system, FLOC has been able to understand which students are served elsewhere in the city, create an advising model for its Scholars Program, and conduct workshops on college-to-career advising. Since using the system, FLOC has developed a tiered advising tool—based on factors such as grades, attendance, and disciplinary incidents—to focus on high-need students and target services individually.

One youth impacted is a FLOC student who, the organization says, struggled academically and was on course to repeat 9th grade for a third time. Thanks to the advising tool created as a result of the Data Sharing Initiative, FLOC was better able to meet the needs of this high-priority student—and is proud to report that the student made the school’s Dean’s List and has moved on to 10th grade.

5. YOUTH EMPLOYMENT

OUR GOAL

To increase the percentage of young adults who are employed full time.

WHO WE ARE

The Youth Employment Change Network (YECN) is composed of government agencies, adult learning institutions, philanthropic organizations, and community-based organizations devoted to equipping DC youth with the proper skills and credentials for immediate employment and long-term careers.

WHAT WE'RE DOING

YECN has spent the last year defining, gathering, and analyzing citywide data related to workforce preparation in the District. YECN is also partnering with the Coalition for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) through a grant from the Lumina Foundation to support a landscaping of career pathways in the District. YECN undertook initial work to gather information on career pathways available to District youth. This work supports CAEL’s effort to map local youth workforce development providers and projects and to analyze the existing infrastructure for youth to embark on a career pathway in five select, high-growth, high-demand industry sectors. As an extension of this project, the YECN has compiled data from local employers related to work-readiness training, in order to reveal opportunities to best prepare our students for employment. 

WHAT'S NEXT

After diving into the data and assessing YECN membership interest and sphere of influence, the Youth Employment Change Network will pivot to spend the next year focused on the early work experience area of workforce development. YECN will also continue to work with C3N and the Disconnected Youth Change Network through the Raise DC Community Partnership for Postsecondary Attainment to improve outcomes for opportunity youth to—and through—postsecondary education.

~ Data: Youth Employment

A NOTE ABOUT THE DATA

For information about how to read the data that follows, please visit the "How to Read this Report" page at the beginning of this report. For details pertaining to data definitions, sources, raw numbers, and notes, please visit the "Data Dictionary" page at the end of this report.

CORE INDICATORS

Full-Time Employment (Ages 20-24)

CPS 2013 (5.0)
39%
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Full-time employment is defined as work for 35+ hours per week. The total number of youth employed full time has remained relatively constant, but given population growth, it now makes up a smaller share of the total population.

The national full-time employment rate for youth ages 20-24 (using the same source and business rules) is 34%.

It is important to note that the goal for this metric is 66% full-time employment, in recognition that a portion of youth ages 20-24 are also still enrolled in school.

 CONTRIBUTING INDICATORS

Early Work Experience: SYEP Enrollment (Ages 16-21)

DOES 2014 (5.01a)
8254
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Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. Department of Employment Services (DOES) data has been cleaned with a check system implemented to avoid counting duplicate entries, youth applying from outside of the District, and youth who are no longer eligible for the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP).

SYEP serves all eligible youth; therefore, there will be natural ebbs and flows to SYEP enrollment. DOES has hypothesized that one factor contributing to the decrease in youth applying for SYEP is the increase in minimum wage (which, at the time, went from $8.25 per hour to $9.50 per hour and has subsequently risen to $10.50 per hour, as of July 1, 2015). Older youth who are eligible to make minimum wage may make the decision to seek employment elsewhere, rather than participate in SYEP, in order to make more money. For FY2015, Mayor Bowser expanded the SYEP eligibility age from 21 to 24, as well as increased the SYEP wage. Youth ages 16-21 will now make $8.25 per hour, and youth ages 22-24 will make $9.25 per hour.

DOES does not currently report SYEP completion; Raise DC will work with DOES to define and measure program completion going forward.

In addition to SYEP, a wide variety of private employers, schools, nonprofit programs, and agencies offer early work experience through youth internship opportunities. However, there is currently no centralized data on this component of early work experience.


Early Work Experience: Part-/Full-Time Employment (Ages 16-19)

BLS 2014 (5.01b)
12%
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Note that this metric was originally listed as a raw number. All indicators have been adjusted, wherever possible, to represent percentages of the youth population, and raw numbers are available in the Data Dictionary.

This metric is intended to capture the percentage of youth (ages 16-19) who receive an early work experience through full- or part-time employment. 


Apprenticeship Enrollment (Ages 18-24)

DOES 2014 (5.02)
427
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Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. Apprentices are sponsored by employers, labor groups, and employer associations that are approved by the DC Apprenticeship Council.

In the last three years, there has been an increased push for more apprenticeships, which resulted in the creation of a pipeline to apprenticeships that did not previously exist. This is directly reflected in the 175% increase.


Labor Force Participation (Ages 16-19)

BLS 2014 (5.03a)
16%
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Labor Force Participation (Ages 20-24)

BLS 2014 (5.03b)
69%
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This indicator measures the percentage of youth involved in the labor force (currently employed or actively looking for work) and is intended to provide additional context around changes in the youth employment environment.

~ Spotlight: Youth Employment

LUMINA FOUNDATION GRANT SUPPORTS YOUTH ATTAINMENT EFFORTS

As the importance of higher education as a gateway to jobs gains wider traction, Raise DC’s work looks to address this demand. By 2020, 76% of job openings in DC will require some postsecondary education, the highest proportion of any state in the country (according to a report from the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce). Raise DC received a grant from Lumina Foundation in late 2014 to support new work that weaves together three Change Networks—Youth Employment, Disconnected Youth, and College and Credential Completion—to adequately meet these needs. This funding supports a concentration on postsecondary achievement for disconnected youth, working to support their ability to not only reconnect to education and achieve their high school diplomas or GEDs, but also to enroll in—and complete—postsecondary education.

While Lumina is supporting 75 communities nationwide through its Community Partnership for Attainment initiative, Raise DC is one of only five partnerships focused on disconnected youth. Change Network partners from local schools, community-based organizations (CBOs), and postsecondary institutions are working collaboratively to improve postsecondary outcomes for disconnected youth. The local partnership, known as the Raise DC Community Partnership for Postsecondary Attainment, emphasizes forging strong relationships between CBOs and agencies that directly serve these youth and the District’s postsecondary institutions. The partners are collectively learning about effective models to support reconnection, as well as gaining knowledge about strategies to help disconnected youth earn their college degrees or other postsecondary credentials. These approaches include dual-enrollment programming that allows students to earn college credit while still in high school or community-based programs and methods to help youth navigate the world of college and career by providing a sustained contact point along the way.

Through Lumina funding, the partnership also leverages technical assistance from local and national partners. Raise DC is working with the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) to engage in a career pathways inventory to map programming, opportunities, and gaps in training in five industry sectors. This will support work to refine DC’s approach to investing in workforce development programming that is currently ongoing through the District of Columbia Workforce Investment Council’s Career Pathways Taskforce.

Data Dictionary

1.0 Children Entering Kindergarten Meeting Expected Benchmarks

1.01 Lead Pre-K Teachers with a Bachelor's Degree
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2012-13
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Publicly funded pre-K teachers with a bachelor's degree.
Denominator: All publicly funded pre-K teachers.
Note: This was collected as part of the annual OSSE staff collection and includes DCPS, public charter schools, and the pre-K incentive classrooms located within CBOs–programs all funded by the uniform per pupil funding formula (UPSFF).
Raw #s: Not available at this time.

1.02a High-Quality Early Childhood Education Development Programs - CBOs (Ages 0-5)
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Accredited and subsidized early childhood CBOs successfully attaining "gold" tier status. 
Denominator: All subsidized early childhood CBOs.
Note: "Gold" standard means that the CBO is accredited. The vast majority of CBOs are NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) accredited, but OSSE also accepts accreditation from the NAFCC (National Association for Family Child Care) and COA (Council on Accreditation).
Raw #s: 106 / 283 = 37.46%

1.02b High-Quality Early Childhood Education Development Programs - DCPS (Ages 3-5)
Source: DCPS SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of DCPS pre-K classrooms that meet Head Start (Title I) standards or are certified by the American Montessori Society or the NAEYC.
Denominator: Total # of DCPS pre-K classrooms.
Note: This metric does not include self-contained special education classrooms, since they have different supports and curriculum.
Raw #s: 299 / 349 = 85.67%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 90% in SY2011-12. Updated Baseline = 88% in SY2011-12. Update due to cleaner data collection.

1.03 Births with Early Prenatal Care
Source: DOH 2013
Data Definition: 
Numerator: DC births with prenatal care in the first trimester.
Denominator: All DC births for which prenatal care status is known (represents ~90% of all DC births).
Note: Prenatal care beginning in the first trimester of pregnancy is defined as the date of the first prenatal care visit occurring during the first three months of pregnancy (or during the first 13 weeks after the first day of the last menstrual period). Births for which unknown "prenatal care began" were subtracted from the total number of births before percentages were computed.
Raw #s: 5286 / 8052 = 65.65%

1.04 Children (Ages 3-5) Receiving Early Screening for Developmental Delays
Source: DCPS FY2014
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Children ages 3-5 receiving a screening for developmental delays who attend Early Stages.
Denominator: All children ages 3-5. 
Note: Note that this does not include Medicaid claims. The source for the denominator is the same source that the Early Childhood division at DCPS uses, which is the ACS 2010 data set.
Raw #s: 4235 / 17605 = 24.05%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 17% in FY2011. Updated Baseline = 23% in FY2011. Updated Baseline due to a change in the data source. This metric originally represented "Children (Ages 0-5) Receiving Early Screening for Developmental Delays" and combined data from OSSE's Strong Start (ages 0-3) program with DCPS' Early Stages (ages 3-5) program. This metric now represents ONLY the Early Stages (ages 3-5) piece of this indicator, and does NOT include the Strong Start (ages 0-3) piece of this indicator.

1.05 Children (Ages 0-5) with a Medical Home (Medicaid Enrollment)
Source: DHCF - Medicaid Form CMS-416 FY2013
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Children ages 0-5 enrolled in Medicaid for at least 90 days.
Denominator: All children ages 0-5.
Note: Medicaid enrollment provides a snapshot of young children with access to medical care and serves as a proxy for a medical home.
Raw #s: 32108 / 49000 = 65.53%

1.06 Children (Ages 0-5) Receiving Health Screenings
Source: DHCF - Medicaid Form CMS-416 FY2013
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Children ages 0-5 enrolled in Medicaid for at least 90 days who receive at least one "well-child visit".
Denominator: All children ages 0-5 enrolled in Medicaid for at least 90 days.
Note: This metric only covers youth enrolled in Medicaid and is inclusive of public health coverage. These children enrolled in Medicaid receive "well-child visits" or comprehensive evaluations of a child's physical, oral, and developmental health.
Raw #s: 24723 / 32108 = 77.00%

2.0a High School Graduation - Four-Year ACGR
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of diplomas awarded.
Denominator: Total # of students who entered 9th grade four years earlier - students who transferred out + students who transferred in.
Note: The four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate is the number of students who graduate in four years with a regular high school diploma divided by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for the graduating class. For any given cohort, students who are entering 9th grade for the first time form a cohort that is subsequently “adjusted” by adding any students who transfer into the cohort later during the next three years and subtracting any students who transfer out, emigrate to another country, or are deceased during that same period. The percent of students graduated divided by the total cohort of students is the adjusted cohort graduation rate. In the case of the five-year rate, the cohort can be modified only for permanent incapacitation and death, and additional graduates are added regardless of what school or sector they graduate from.
Raw #s: 3129 / 5100 = 61.35%

2.0b High School Graduation - Five-Year ACGR
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition:
Numerator: Total # of diplomas awarded.
Denominator: Total # of students who entered 9th grade five years earlier - students who transferred out + students who transferred in.
Note: The five-year ACGR utilizes the same business rules as the four-year ACGR, with five years worth of data. Therefore, the denominator for five-year ACGR in SY2013-14 is freshman who were 9th graders in SY2009-10.
Raw #s: 3354 / 4963 = 67.58%

2.0c Overall Reading Proficiency - DCCAS
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of students scoring "proficient" or "advanced" on DCCAS reading assessment.
Denominator: Total # of students who spent the full academic year in a DC school.
Raw #s: 15570 / 30934 = 50.33%

2.0d Overall Math Proficiency - DCCAS
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of students scoring "proficient" or "advanced" on DCCAS math assessment.
Denominator: Total # of students who spent the full academic year in a DC school.
Raw #s: 17038 / 31003 = 54.96%

2.01 3rd Grade Reading Proficiency - DCCAS
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of 3rd grade students scoring "proficient" or "advanced" on DCCAS reading assessment.
Denominator: Total # of 3rd grade students who spent the full academic year in a DC school.
Raw #s: 2312 / 5256 = 43.99%

2.02 3rd Grade Math Proficiency - DCCAS
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of 3rd grade students scoring "proficient" or "advanced" on DCCAS math assessment.
Denominator: Total # of 3rd grade students who spent the full academic year in a DC school.
Raw #s: 2488 / 5271 = 47.20%

2.03 8th Grade Reading Proficiency - DCCAS
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of 8th grade students scoring "proficient" or "advanced" on DCCAS reading assessment.
Denominator: Total # of 8th grade students who spent the full academic year in a DC school.
Raw #s: 2199 / 4070 = 54.03%

2.04 8th Grade Math Proficiency - DCCAS
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of 8th grade students scoring "proficient" or "advanced" on DCCAS math assessment.
Denominator: Total # of 8th grade students who spent the full academic year in a DC school.
Raw #s: 2662 / 4072 = 65.37%

2.05 9th to 10th Grade Promotion
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of SY2012-13 9th graders who appeared in the SY2013-14 enrollment audit having been promoted (to 10th, 11th, or 12th grade).
Denominator: Total # of SY2012-13 9th graders who appear in the SY2013-14 enrollment audit (regardless of grade).
Note: Note that this metric excludes students who attend nontraditional (alternative and adult) schools, includes only students who appear in both the SY2012-13 and SY2013-14 enrollment audit, and represents all SY2012-13 9th graders as the denominator. Note that in some instances, students are promoted directly from 9th grade to 11th or 12th grade (likely due to missing a critical course required to pass 9th grade).
Raw #s: 3849 / 4851 = 79.34%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 78% in SY2011-12. New Baseline = 76% in SY2011-12. Updated Baseline due to improved data collection. 

2.06 Truancy 
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition:
Numerator: N/A
Denominator: N/A
Raw #s: N/A
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 20.1% in SY2011-12. There will be a New Baseline as a result of new regulations that impacted the definition of being "present" in school, as well as the fact that, to date, there has not been a consistently applied cross-sector definition of "truancy". The Truancy Taskforce, convened by the DME and Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services and including OSSE, DCPS, and the PCSB as members, is working to agree upon and recommend a single, cross-sector definition of "truancy" to be measured by OSSE. The Truancy Taskforce expects to make its recommendation by fall 2015, and Raise DC's Progress Report will reflect this definition moving forward.

2.07 Suspensions
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of students receiving an out-of-school suspension for any reason. 
Denominator: Total # of students who were enrolled during the enrollment audit.
Note: Each LEA creates its own policy for determining appropriate disciplinary action.
Raw #s: 9329 / 82941 = 11.25%

2.08 Expulsions
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition:
Numerator: # of students expelled.
Denominator: Total # of students who were enrolled during the enrollment audit.
Note: The charter sector does not currently have one designated alternative school to transfer middle or high school students for long-term disciplinary reasons. DCPS schools have adopted a discipline code that only allows for expulsion in extreme cases, such as incidents of extreme violence such as attacking a student or staff member. DCPS schools do have the option of transferring a middle or high school student to an alternative school for disciplinary reasons, and these transfers are not counted as expulsions.
Raw #s: 133 / 82941 = 0.16%

2.09 In-Seat Attendance
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of days present.
Denominator: Total # of days enrolled.
Note: In-seat attendance is the rate at which students are present at school. Any absence, whether excused or unexcused, counts against this number. Different schools have different standards for what counts as an excused absence.
Raw #s: 12625272 / 14008526 = 90.13%

3.0a Disconnected Youth (Ages 16-24)
Source: ACS 2010-2012 Three-Year Data Set
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of youth ages 16-24 who are not employed or in the labor force, not living in group quarters, at less than 200% poverty, with less than an associate's degree, not receiving retirement benefits/self-employed, and are not in the armed forces.
Denominator: Total # of youth ages 16-24.
Note: This definition of "disconnected youth" includes low-income youth ages 16-24 with low levels of education who are not in school and not working (They may have a HS diploma or GED.)
Raw #s: 8097 / 95058 = 8.52%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 9910 in 2010. There will be a New Baseline due to a change in the data source. The New Baseline uses three-year American Community Survey (ACS) data, permitting greater confidence in our measurements. Three-year estimates pool multiple years of ACS data, essentially tripling the sample sizes, allowing researchers to make more accurate comparisons among data (such as the disconnected youth population in DC). From this point forward, Raise DC will track the Disconnected Youth metric every three years, upon the release of a new set of pooled data.

3.0b Educationally Disengaged Youth (Ages 16-24)
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2012-13
Data Definition: 
Numerator: Total # of youth currently ages 16-24 years who enrolled at some point in a DC public or public charter school between SY2006-07 and SY2012-13 who had not attained a GED or HS diploma and were not enrolled in an educational program as of the end of SY2013-14.
Denominator: Total enrollment of youth ages 16-24 (SY2006-07 through SY2012-13).
Note: This definition of "educationally disengaged" includes youth ages 16-24 who are not in school and don't have a HS diploma/GED (They may be working.)
Raw #s: 7493 / 55314 = 13.55%

3.01 DC Public or Public Charter School Exits (Ages 16-24)
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2012-13
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of youth ages 16-24 who exited a DC public or public charter school (either during the given year or during the summer before) without a verified enrollment in another educational program (e.g., high school, GED prep, certification program).
Denominator: Total # of 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, ungraded, and adult students ages 16-24 enrolled in SY2012-13 who would be expected to enroll in school in SY2013-14 (i.e., did not graduate or leave the state educational system).
Raw #s: 1583 / 17240 = 9.18%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 1953 in SY2010-11. New Baseline = 8% in SY2010-11. Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. As a result of the Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate (ACGR) process, we are able to identify students who leave school because they leave the state (and remove them from this count).

3.02 Out-of-School Youth - Secondary Reconnection (Ages 16-24)
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2012-13
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of formerly disengaged youth who re-enrolled in a traditional K-12 school.
Denominator: N/A
Note: A denominator cannot be determined for this metric yet, as OSSE is unable to determine how many youth were disengaged "as of" SY2012-13.
Raw #s: 1304
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 3049 in SY2011-12. New Baseline = 1131 in SY2011-12. Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. We are now able to distinguish "formerly disengaged youth" from those who directly enroll in alternative or adult programs from traditional high schools. The previous metric captured all students enrolled in adult and alternative programs.

3.03 Out-of-School Youth - Postsecondary Reconnection (Ages 16-24)
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2012-13
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of formerly disengaged youth who enrolled in a postsecondary institution during the specified year.
Denominator: N/A
Note: A denominator cannot be determined for this metric yet, as OSSE is unable to determine how many youth were disengaged "as of" SY2012-13.
Raw #s: 683
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 71 in SY2011-12. New Baseline = 611 in SY2011-12. Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. We are now able to identify how many formerly disengaged youth then re-enroll in postsecondary educational institutions in a given academic year.

3.04 Out-of-School Youth - Employment Training (Ages 16-24)
Source: DOES 2014
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of formerly out-of-school youth ages 16-24 connected to employment training through various DOES programs. This metric is comprised of out-of-school youth enrolled in WIA-funded programs and Pathways for Young Adults Program (PYAP).
Denominator: N/A
Note: N/A
Raw #s: 343
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 580 in 2012. New Baseline = 337 in 2012. Updated Baseline due cleaner data collection. The Original Baseline for this indicator included programs that could not necessarily be disaggregated by out-of-school youth. It is important to note that this number does not represent all of the out-of-school youth in employment training programs throughout the District. This number includes a variety of employment training programs captured by the Department of Employment Services, and these programs fluctuate year over year and make it a challenge to provide consistent comparison. While there are a variety of community-based programs that provide employment training for out-of-school youth, there is no common repository that captures this information.

4.0a Three-Year Associate's Degree Attainment (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)
Source: OSSE/NSC SY2010-11
Data Definition:
Numerator: # of certified high school graduates with a regular diploma who graduate from a two-year institution within three years of high school graduation.
Denominator: # of certified high school graduates with a regular diploma who enroll in postsecondary education within three years of high school graduation.
Note: SY2010-11 indicates that the denominator is for students who graduated from high school in SY2010-11.
Raw #s: 41 / 1922 = 2.13%

4.0b Six-Year Bachelor's Degree Attainment (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)
Source: OSSE/NSC SY2007-08
Data Definition:
Numerator: # of certified high school graduates with a regular diploma who enroll in postsecondary education who graduate from a four-year institution within six years of high school graduation.
Denominator: # of certified high school graduates with a regular diploma who enroll in postsecondary education within six years of high school graduation.
Note: SY2007-08 indicates that the denominator is for students who graduated from high school in SY2007-08.
Raw #s: 765 / 1769 = 43.24%

4.0c Two-Year UDC-CC Certificate Completion (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)
Source: UDC-CC FY2014
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of UDC-CC students (ages 24 & under) who complete a one-semester certificate program within two years. 
Denominator: Total # of UDC-CC students (ages 24 & under) who have been enrolled in a certificate program for at least two years.
Note: It is important to note that this metric only represents UDC-CC students ages 24 and under (Raise DC's age range).The average age for UDC-CC WDLL Division is 37, and the completion rate for the overall student body is 73%. As well, certificates do not reflect third-party certifications, which are collected and often kept by the individual vendors offering these programs.
Raw #s: 287 / 468 = 61.32%

4.01a Postsecondary Enrollment - Six Months (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)
Source: OSSE/NSC SY2011-12
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of certified high school graduates with a diploma who enroll in college within six months.
Denominator: # of certified graduates with a diploma.
Raw #s: 1904 / 3841 = 49.57%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 41% in SY2009-10. New Baseline = 49% in SY2009-10. Updated Baseline due to new and improved data collection, along with the application of new business rules. Since the release of the baseline report card in 2013, OSSE has been able to glean deeper insights into DC students’ college-going behavior by using SLED, in tandem with data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC).

4.01b Postsecondary Enrollment - 12 Months (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)
Source: OSSE/NSC SY2011-12
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of certified high school graduates with a diploma who enroll in college within 12 months.
Denominator: # of certified graduates with a diploma. 
Raw #s: 2089 / 3841 = 54.39%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 48% in SY2009-10. New Baseline = 55% in SY2009-10. Updated Baseline due to new and improved data collection, along with the application of new business rules. Since the release of the baseline report card in 2013, OSSE has been able to glean deeper insights into DC students’ college-going behavior by using SLED, in tandem with data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC).

4.01c Postsecondary Enrollment - 18 Months (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)
Source: OSSE/NSC SY2011-12
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of certified high school graduates with a diploma who enroll in college within 18 months.
Denominator: # of certified graduates with a diploma. 
Raw #s: 2300 / 3841 = 59.88%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 55% in SY2009-10. New Baseline = 61% in SY2009-10Updated Baseline due to new and improved data collection, along with the application of new business rules. Since the release of the baseline report card in 2013, OSSE has been able to glean deeper insights into DC students’ college-going behavior by using SLED, in tandem with data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC).

4.02 Postsecondary Persistence - First to Second Year (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)
Source: OSSE/NSC SY2011-12
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of certified high school graduates who enroll in college within 12 months who return to postsecondary education the following school year.
Denominator: # of certified high school graduates who enroll in college within 12 months.
Raw #s: 1556 / 2089 = 74.49%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 74% in SY2009-10. New Baseline = 76% in SY2009-10. Updated Baseline due to new and improved data collection, along with the application of new business rules. Since the release of the baseline report card in 2013, OSSE has been able to glean deeper insights into DC students’ college-going behavior by using SLED, in tandem with data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC).

4.03a FAFSA Completion (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)
Source: OSSE
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of certified high school graduates with a diploma completing the FAFSA.
Denominator: # of certified high school graduates with a diploma.
Raw #s:
N/A
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 85% in SY2011-12. There will be a New Baseline due to a change in the data source. OSSE is now able to track longitudinal data for FAFSA completion, but this will not be finalized until late summer 2015 (when the FAFSA is due). Baseline will be set in 2016.

4.03b DC TAG OneApp Application Completion (HS Graduates, 24 and Under)
Source: OSSE/SLED SY2013-14
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of certified high school graduates completing the OneApp.
Denominator: # of certified high school graduates with a diploma.
Raw #s: 2379 / 3838 = 61.99%
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 54% in SY2011-12. New Baseline = 66% in SY2011-12. Updated Baseline due to a change in the business rules. This metric now uses all certified high school graduates for the denominator.

5.0 Full-Time Employment (Ages 20-24)
Source: CPS 2013
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of youth ages 20-24 who are employed full time (at least 35 hours per week) for the given year.
Denominator: Total # of civilian noninstitutional youth ages 20-24 for the given year.
Note: This includes youth who live in the District but may not necessarily work in the District. This number also includes youth who participate in SYEP.
Raw #s: 23205 / 59294 = 39.14%

5.01a Early Work Experience: SYEP Enrollment (Ages 16-21)
Source: DOES 2014
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of youth ages 16-21 accepted for the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP).
Denominator: N/A
Note: This number reflects the number of youth ages 16-21 accepted for SYEP and given a job assignment. This number excludes 14 and 15 year olds enrolled in SYEP, since they are typically assigned to work prep activities rather than work placements. To be eligible for SYEP, youth must be ages 14-24, live in Washington, DC, have a verified social security number, and have permission to work. Parental consent is required for youth under age 18.
Raw #s: 8254
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 10706 in 2012. New Baseline = 10200 in 2012. Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection. DOES data has been cleaned with a check system implemented to avoid counting duplicate entries, youth applying from outside of the District, and youth who are no longer eligible for the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP).

5.01b Early Work Experience: Part-/Full-Time Employment (Ages 16-19)
Source: BLS 2014
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of youth ages 16-19 employed (full time or part time) for the given year.
Denominator: Total # of youth ages 16-19 for the given year.
Note: This includes youth who live in the District but may not necessarily work in the District. This number also includes youth who participate in SYEP.
Raw #s: 2728 / 22000 = 12.4%

5.02 Apprenticeship Enrollment (Ages 18-24)
Source: DOES 2014
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of youth ages 18-24 enrolled in apprenticeship programs in the District who have registered with the DC Office of Apprenticeships.
Denominator: N/A
Note: This number includes all registered apprenticeships, which can be sponsored by employers, labor groups/unions, and employer associations that are approved by the DC Apprenticeship Council.
Raw #s: 427
*Baseline Update: Original Baseline = 142 in 2011. New Baseline = 155 in 2012. Updated Baseline due to cleaner data collection.

5.03a Labor Force Participation (Ages 16-19)
Source: BLS 2014
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of youth ages 16-19 either employed or looking for work for the given year.
Denominator: Total # of youth ages 16-19 for the given year.
Raw #s: 3410 / 22000 = 15.50%

5.03b Labor Force Participation (Ages 20-24)
Source: BLS 2014
Data Definition: 
Numerator: # of youth ages 20-24 either employed or looking for work for the given year.
Denominator: Total # of youth ages 20-24 for the given year.
Raw #s: 40000 / 58000 = 68.97%

Our People

Raise DC Staff and Operations Team

  • Laurie Wingate (Staff), Raise DC, Executive Director
  • Celine Fejeran (Staff), Raise DC, Senior Director for Strategic Initiatives
  • Allison Hagaman (Staff), Raise DC, Data Manager
  • Gretchen Wieland (Staff), Raise DC, Communications Manager
  • Aisha Shah (Staff), Raise DC, Program Associate
  • Kilin Boardman-Schroyer (Disconnected Youth Change Network Lead), OSSE, Deputy Assistant Superintendent, OSSE's Division of Postsecondary and Career Education
  • John Cavanaugh (College & Credential Completion Change Network Lead), Consortium of Universities in the Washington Metropolitan Area, President & CEO
  • Amy Dudas (Advocacy Partner; Youth Employment Change Network Lead), DCAYA, Policy Analyst
  • Michelle Gilliard (Disconnected Youth Change Network Lead), VPP, Partner
  • Grace Katabaruki (Disconnected Youth Change Network Lead), VPP, Principal
  • Michael Longaro (College & Credential Completion Change Network Lead), OSSE, Manager, Stakeholder Engagement
  • Benton Murphy (Youth Employment Change Network Lead), Community Foundation for the National Capitol Region, Senior Director, Philanthropic Services
  • Dana Oliver (Youth Employment Change Network Lead), Accenture Federal Services, Managing Director
  • Maggie Riden (Advocacy Partner), DCAYA, Executive Director

Raise DC's Advocacy Partner

Raise DC's partnership with the DC Alliance of Youth Advocates (DCAYA) is funded by the Meyer Foundation. DCAYA serves as Raise DC’s policy and advocacy arm, utilizing DCAYA's proven expertise to ensure that elected officials are active partners in Raise DC’s work. DCAYA accomplishes this by lifting up the voices of Raise DC’s Change Networks to ensure that key decision-makers institute the necessary policies and funding to support improved outcomes for DC children and youth.

Raise DC Leadership Council

  • America Achieves, Michele Jolin, CEO, and Co-Founder, Results for America
  • Accenture, Jessica Long, Managing Director
  • Annie E. Casey Foundation, Allison Gerber, Senior Associate
  • CityBridge Foundation, Katherine Bradley, President
  • College Success Foundation – DC, Herb Tillery, Executive Director; Raise DC Co-Chair
  • Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, Bruce McNamer, President & CEO
  • DC Appleseed, Walter Smith, Executive Director
  • DC Public Charter School Board, Scott Pearson, Executive Director
  • District of Columbia Public Schools, Kaya Henderson, Chancellor
  • Fight for Children, Michela English, President & CEO
  • Georgetown University, John DeGioia, President
  • Latin American Youth Center, Lori Kaplan, President & CEO
  • Martha's Table, Patty Stonesifer, President & CEO
  • Meyer Foundation, Nicky Goren, President & CEO
  • Microsoft, Donna Woodall, Director, Citizenship & Public Affairs for the Northeast Region
  • Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education, Jennifer Niles, Deputy Mayor
  • Office of the Deputy Mayor for Health & Human Services, Brenda Donald, Deputy Mayor
  • Office of the State Superintendent of Education, Hanseul Kang, State Superintendent
  • PNC Bank, Michael Harreld, Regional President
  • Reingold LINK, Michael Akin, President
  • Raise DC, Wendy Goldberg, Co-Chair
  • See Forever Foundation/Maya Angelou PCS, Heather Wathington, CEO
  • State Board of Education, Jack Jacobson, President
  • Trinity College, Pat McGuire, President
  • UDC Community College, Kim Ford, Dean, Workforce Development and Lifelong Learning
  • United Way – National Capital Area, Rosie Allen Herring, President & CEO
  • Venture Philanthropy Partners, Carol Thompson Cole, President & CEO
  • Washington Area Women's Foundation, Jennifer Lockwood-Shabat, President & CEO
  • Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers, Tamara Copeland, President
  • World Bank, Viki Betancourt, retired

Raise DC Change Network Members

  • Academy of Hope
  • Accenture
  • After-School All-Stars
  • Alcanzando Metas Foundation
  • Asian American Lead
  • AVID
  • Ballou STAY High School
  • Bell Multicultural High School
  • BlackStar
  • Brookings Institution
  • BUILD Metro DC
  • Capital City Public Charter School
  • Capital Partners for Education
  • Carlos Rosario International Public Charter School
  • Cesar Chavez Public Charter Schools
  • Children’s Defense Fund
  • Children's National Health System
  • Citi Foundation
  • City Gate, Inc.
  • College Advocate
  • College and Career Connections
  • College Board
  • College Bound
  • COLLEGE IS COOL
  • College Success Foundation
  • College Summit
  • Collegiate Directions, Inc.
  • Columbia Heights Educational Campus
  • Communities in Schools in the Nation’s Capital
  • Community Club
  • Community Foundation for the National Capital Region
  • Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area
  • Courtyard by Marriott Washington Convention Center
  • Covenant House Washington DC
  • Critical Exposure
  • DC Alliance of Youth Advocates
  • DC Appleseed
  • DC Association of Chartered Public Schools
  • DC Child and Family Services
  • DC Trust
  • The DC Collaborative
  • DC College Access Program
  • DC Department of Behavioral Health
  • DC Department of Employment Services
  • DC Department Of Health
  • DC Department of Health Care Finance
  • DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services
  • DC Department on Disability Services
  • DC Dream
  • DC Housing Authority
  • DC Prep
  • DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative
  • DC Public Charter School Board
  • DC Public Schools
  • DC Rehabilitation Services Administration
  • DC Scores
  • Deloitte
  • Drayton Consulting
  • Eliot-Hine Middle School
  • Emerging Scholars Program
  • Executive Office of the Mayor
  • Fight for Children
  • First Book
  • Flamboyan Foundation
  • For Love of Children
  • Friendship Collegiate Academy
  • Friendship Edison PCS
  • Friendship Tech Prep Academy
  • George Mason University
  • George Washington University
  • Georgetown University Institute for College Preparation
  • Global Skills X-Change
  • Goodwill of Greater Washington
  • H.D. Woodson
  • The Herb Block Foundation
  • Higher Achievement
  • Hope and a Home
  • Howard University Center of Excellence
  • I'm First!
  • Institute for Educational Leadership
  • Institute for Higher Education Policy
  • Job Corps
  • Jobs for America’s Graduates
  • KIPP DC
  • Latin American Youth Center
  • LAYC Career Academy Public Charter School
  • LAYC Promotor Pathway
  • Life Pieces to Masterpieces
  • Limbic Systems, Inc.
  • Link2:DC
  • Living Classrooms Foundation
  • Mary's Center
  • Maya Angelou Public Charter Schools & See Forever Foundation
  • Mentor Foundation USA
  • Mentors, Inc.
  • Minds Matter
  • Montgomery College
  • Multicultural Community Service
  • NASPA
  • National Council of La Raza
  • National Council of Negro Women
  • National Office for School Counselor Advocacy
  • New Community for Children
  • New Futures
  • Next Step Public Charter School
  • Northern Virginia Community College
  • Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education
  • Office of the State Superintendent of Education
  • On-Ramps to Careers
  • Options Public Charter School
  • Perry Street Preparatory Public Charter School
  • Play it Smart
  • POSSE Foundation
  • Prince George's Community College
  • Public Allies Washington DC
  • Reach for College!
  • REACH4SUCCESS
  • Sasha Bruce Youthwork
  • SchoolTalk DC
  • SEED Foundation
  • The SEED School of Washington, D.C.
  • Senior High Alliance of Parents, Principals, & Educators
  • So Others Might Eat
  • Southeast Children's Fund
  • Spark the Wave
  • Strive for College
  • Student Support Center
  • SWEET
  • The Corps Network
  • The Economic Club of Washington D.C.
  • The Education Trust
  • Thurgood Marshall Academy
  • Tiger Woods Learning Center
  • Tour for Diversity in Medicine
  • Trinity Washington University
  • Turning the Page
  • Two Rivers Public Charter School
  • United Negro College Fund
  • United Planning Organization
  • United Way of the National Capital Area
  • Unity Health Care
  • University of DC Community College
  • University of DC CARE Dual Enrollment Program
  • University of DC Talent Search
  • University of DC Upward Bound
  • Urban Alliance
  • USA Technology Services
  • Venture Philanthropy Partners
  • Washington Area Women’s Foundation
  • Washington Jesuit Academy
  • Washington National Cathedral Scholars Program
  • Washingtonians for Children
  • West Education Campus
  • WETA
  • Workforce Investment Council
  • workforce.io
  • Year Up National Capital Region
  • YMCA
  • YouthBuild Public Charter School

Raise DC Data Committee

Representatives of the following agencies and organizations form the Raise DC Data Committee:

  • Appletree Institute
  • Brookings Institution
  • Data Quality Campaign
  • DC Alliance of Youth Advocates
  • DC Appleseed
  • DC Fiscal Policy Institute
  • DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative
  • DC Public Charter School Board
  • DC Public Schools
  • Department of Employment Services
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Health Care Finance
  • Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services
  • Institute for Educational Leadership
  • Martha's Table
  • Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education
  • Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development
  • Office of the State Superintendent of Education
  • See Forever Foundation
  • Tembo, Inc.
  • University of the District of Columbia – Community College
  • Urban Institute
  • Workforce Investment Council
  • World Bank

Our Supporters


Anchor Entity: The Community Foundation for the National Capital Region serves as Raise DC's "backbone organization" providing financial support, back-office capacity, and office space. The president of The Community Foundation also serves on Raise DC's Leadership Council. Raise DC is grateful for The Community Foundation's commitment to incubate Raise DC.

Key Supporters: Raise DC thanks the following organizations for their generous leadership, in-kind support, and financial resources:

Get Involved

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  1. Join a Change Network. Email us for more information about joining the:
    • Early Childhood Change Network
    • School Success Change Network
    • Disconnected Youth Change Network
    • College & Credential Completion Change Network
    • Youth Employment Change Network
  2. Donate. Click here to donate to Raise DC. We thank you for your generous support!
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