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Michigan Data Dashboard Community Report

Moving the Needle on Educational Attainment in Michigan

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About the Report

Our Mission

To increase college readiness, participation, and completion in Michigan, particularly among low-income students, first-generation college going students, and students of color.

Following our own call-to-action from the 2012 MCAN Conference 'Measuring What Matters,' the Michigan College Access Network utilized 2012-2013 to determine the goals and the corresponding outcome measures that would be utilized to benchmark our success as a statewide college access organization and developed our public Dashboard Community Report. What follows is the current (or most up-to-date) available data for each goal and outcome measures, data is updated annually.

The Michigan College Access Network is working to:

  1. Enhance Michigan's college-going culture
  2. Increase the percentage of students who enter college prepared to succeed in credit bearing coursework
  3. Increasing the percentage of students utilizing federal financial aid
  4. Increase the percentage of students who immediately enroll in college following high school graduation
  5. Significantly increase the percentage of students who persist towards degree completion
  6. Increase the percent of students completing postsecondary degrees and credentials, and
  7. Achieve the Big Goal - 60% of MIchigan's residents will have a postsecondary degree or credential by the year 2025.

Please take a look around and see how Michigan is moving the needle on college access and success indicators!


Michigan's Pipeline

Out of 100 Michigan 9th Graders...

73 graduate high school on time...

45 enroll into postsecondary education within 12 months of graduation...

32 persist from their 1st to their 2nd year...

18 graduate with a degree within 6 years.

The Michigan College Access Network is hyper-focused on closing the leaks in the pipeline between high school graduation and college completion.  We understand, however, that there are many contributing factors and pieces to the puzzle. We will ultimately measure our long-term success on achieving the Big Goal - 60% of Michigan's residents will have a postsecondary degree or credential by the year 2025.


Goal 1: Culture

MICHIGAN'S COLLEGE GOING CULTURE

Culture consists of the underlying values, beliefs, and meanings which are deeply held, static, and enduring. In order to impact Michigan's educational attainment rate, the citizens of our great state must understand, value, and believe in both the private and public value of postsecondary educational attainment.

WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?

When students have school, parental, and community support, college is seen as the norm - higher education is the expectation rather than the exception. While we know that student and parental aspiration data lags behind current enrollment and completion data, we also know that the first step in the college-going process for a student is to aspire to pursue postsecondary education.

Michigan has persistently lagged behind the national average in college attainment. As our economy transforms from a manufacturing-based economy to a knowledge-based economy, we cannot ignore the need to also transform our culture into one that values the importance of postsecondary education.

HOW ARE WE DOING?

College-Going Culture as Measured by State of the State Survey Data

The percent of Michigan residents who think college is very important to be successful in the labor market is tracked annually through the Michigan State of the State Survey, administered by the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research at Michigan State University. For the purposes of the college-going culture survey questions, a college education was defined to the survey respondent as earning a degree or certificate from an accredited educational institution beyond high school, such as a technical school, community college, or university. Survey respondents were able to choose from the following options: very important, somewhat important, neither important nor unimportant, somewhat unimportant, very unimportant, or don't know.

WHAT IT TELLS US:

In the Winter 2015, 71.1% of Michigan residents thought college was very important to be successful in the labor market.

This represents an increase from the previous year of 0.4% and a drop of 0.6% since the baseline year.


WHAT IT TELLS US:

In the Winter 2014, 79% of Michigan residents thought that it was very likely that their child would get a college education.

This represents a drop from the previous year of 2.4% and a drop of 4.6% since the baseline year.


Source: State of the State Survey, Michigan State University Institute for Public Policy and Social Research, Updated Winter 2015

Goal 2: Academic Readiness

STUDENTS WHO ENTER COLLEGE PREPARED TO SUCCEED IN CREDIT BEARING COURSEWORK

It is imperative that students are academically prepared to pursue and succeed in college-level coursework. All students should be encouraged to take rigorous and challenging academic coursework to have the best chance of success in college.

Why is this Important?

As we work to increase the number of students successfully accessing postsecondary education, we must also ensure students are prepared to succeed in college-level coursework and are not required to take remedial courses. Graduation rates for students who started in remediation are deplorable: Fewer than 1 in 10 graduate from community colleges within three years and only a third complete bachelor’s degrees in six years. By working to ensure all students are academically prepared to succeed in college before they enter, we can maximize the odds that these students will ultimately complete their program of study.

SAT Total Score

HOW ARE WE DOING?

The academic readiness of students is measured in several ways. For the years 2015-16 and beyond, the data below depcts the mean SAT score of 11th grade stduents in the state of Michigan. For the years 2008-2014-15, the data below depicts the average ACT composite score of 11th grade students in the state of Michigan. Every student in the state is required to complete the ACT/SAT assessment to receive a high school diploma. The data includes students' scores on the test administered during the Michigan Merit Examination in the spring of grade 11. This information is collected by the Center for Educational Performance and Information from ACT/College Board and communicated through MI School Data. MI School Data provides a wealth of information on Michigan's public school education system that will help make informed educational decisions, help improve instruction, and enable school systems to prepare a higher percentage of students to succeed in rigorous high school courses and postsecondary education

WHAT IT TELLS US:

For graduating class of 2016-2017 (tested in 2016), the SAT mean total score was 1001.2.

*The test utilized to measured college readiness and utilized for college entrance was changed for the 2015-16 testing year, the class of 2016-17. Because of the instrument change a new baseline has been set for the 2015-16 testing year.

College Readiness Benchmarks

For the year 2015-16 testing year and beyond the data depicts the percentage of students meeting the college-ready benchmarks in both subjects on the SAT, in addition to the percentage of students meeting the college-ready benchmarks, disaggregated by subject. Students with an SAT Math section score that meets or exceeds the benchmark have a 75 percent chance of earning at least a C in first-semester, credit-bearing college courses in algebra, statistics, pre-calculus, or calculus. Students with an SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (ERW) section score that meets or exceeds the benchmark have a 75 percent chance of earning at least a C in first-semester, credit-bearing college courses in history, literature, social sciences, or writing classes. The SAT subject level college-ready benchmarks are: Evidence-Based Reading and Writing - 480, Math - 530.

For the years 2008-2015 the data depicts the percentage of students meeting the college-ready benchmarks in all 4 subjects on the ACT in the state of Michigan in addition to the percentage of students meeting the college-ready benchmarks, disaggregated by subject. The benchmarks are scores on the ACT subject-area tests that represent the level of achievement required for students to have a 50% chance of obtaining a B or higher or a 75% chance of obtaining a C or higher in corresponding credit-bearing first-year college courses. These college courses include English composition, college algebra, introductory social science courses, and biology. The ACT subject level college-ready benchmarks are: Reading - 22, Science - 23, Math - 22, and English - 18.

Every student in the state is required to complete the ACT/SAT assessment to receive a high school diploma. The data includes students' scores on the test administered during the Michigan Merit Examination in the spring of grade 11.

11th Grade Students Scoring At or Above the ACT College-Ready BenchmarksWHAT IT TELLS US:

For graduating class of 2016-2017 (tested 2016), 34.9% of students met or exceeded the college-ready benchmarks on both subjects of the SAT assessment, 60.2 met or exceeded the college-ready benchmark in Evidence-Based Reading and Writing, and 36.9% met or exceeded the college-ready benchmark in math.

*The test utilized to measured college readiness and utilized for college entrance was changed for the 2015-16 testing year, the class of 2016-17. Because of the instrument change a new baseline has been set for the 2015-16 testing year.

Please note between 2012-13 and 2013-14 ACT reassessed and made changes to the College Readiness Benchmarks in Reading (from 22 to 23) and Science (24 to 23). This accounts for some of the increase and drop in students meeting the benchmarks in these two subjects, specifically. For more information about the changes please click here.


Remedial Coursework

The data below depicts the percentage of graduates enrolled in a postsecondary institution (within 16 months of high school graduation) who do not require any remedial coursework. Remedial coursework is identified by the college or university and includes math, reading, writing and science.

WHAT IT TELLS US

For high school graduating class of 2014-2015, 71.4% of graduates enrolled in college were not required to take remedial coursework.

This represents an increase of 0.8% from the baseline and a drop of 1.5% from the previous year.

Source: www.mischooldata.org updated on 4/17/17. ACT testing data is based on ACT tests administrations completed during the Michigan Merit Examinations in the Spring of grade 11. Student re-tests are not included

Goal 3: Financial Readiness

STUDENTS UTILIZING FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID

The most commonly cited barrier to postsecondary education is college affordability. Along with being socially, informationally, and academically ready, it is equally important that all students have access to the necessary funds to enroll, persist, and complete college.

Why is this Important?

With the growing media surrounding the increasing average student loan debt, many students have been left wondering, "Is college worth it?". Research shows that individuals with a college degree make, on average, one million dollars more over the course of their lifetime than an individual with only a high school diploma. Research also shows that middle and high school students perceive the cost of college to be 1 million dollars or more. We must ensure students have the financial knowledge, literacy, and readiness to understand the costs and benefits of postsecondary education, and that they have the means available to enroll and complete their degree or credential.

HOW ARE WE DOING?

Completing the FAFSA

The financial readiness of students is calculated by the percentage of high school seniors completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The data depicted below is a ratio between the number of FAFSA forms completed in Michigan by first-time filers, no older than 18 years of age, who will have received their high school diploma by the start of the following academic year, and the estimated number of seniors enrolled in the state of Michigan. The FAFSA completion data is provided by Federal Student Aid within the U.S. Department of Education. The senior enrollment data is collected by the Center for Educational Performance and is communicated through MI School Data. MI School Data provides a wealth of data on Michigan's public school education system that will help make informed educational decisions, help improve instruction and enable school systems to prepare a higher percentage of students to succeed in rigorous high school courses and postsecondary education.

Students Utilizing Federal Financial Aid

WHAT IT TELLS US:

For graduating class of 2015-2016, 56.7% of projected graduates completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

This represents a decrease of 1.5% from the previous year but a 1.5% increase from the baseline year.


Source: Federal Student Aid data Center (as of end of June, annually) and WICHE.
Calculated based on the projected number of graduates from both public and private high schools

Goal 4: College Enrollment

STUDENTS WHO ENROLL IN COLLEGE FOLLOWING HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION


The 21st Century global economy demands education beyond high school, whether it is a high-skilled certification, an Associate Degree, a Bachelor's Degree, or beyond. In order to complete a degree, students must first enroll in a postsecondary institution that is a good match or "fit" for their aspirations, academic aptitude, and career ambitions.

Why is this Important?

For generations, Michigan families were able to rely on a high school diploma to provide a middle-class lifestyle thanks to the robust labor market of the automobile manufacturing industry. MCAN leads the charge in changing the hearts and minds of Michiganders by espousing the mantra that a high school diploma simply is not enough to compete in the 21st century global economy. There are many individual and community benefits of postsecondary education. Some benefits include: increased median income, decreased unemployment rates, lower smoking rates, lower incarceration rates, higher levels of civic participation including volunteerism, voting and blood donation.

HOW ARE WE DOING?

College Enrollment

The percent of students who enroll in college is tracked through MI School Data. MI School Data provides a wealth of data on Michigan's public school education system that will help make informed educational decisions, help improve instruction and enable school systems to prepare a higher percentage of students to succeed in rigorous high school courses and postsecondary education. College Enrollment data from the Center for Educational Performance and Information (CEPI) is matched against national college enrollment data from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) to create a full data set. NSC is a third-party data warehouse that collects enrollment data from over 90% of colleges in the U.S. The measure below presents the percent of recent high school graduates who enroll in a postsecondary institution within 12 months of high school graduation.

WHAT IT TELLS US:

For graduating class of 2014-2015, 69.6% of high school graduates enrolled in a higher education institution within 12 months of high school graduation.

This represents an increase of 3.6% from the baseline and an decrease from the previous year of 0.2%.

Source: www.mischooldata.org, updated on 5/31/17

Goal 5: College Persistence

STUDENTS WHO PERSIST TOWARDS DEGREE COMPLETION


While focusing on increasing students access to postsecondary educational opportunities, it is equally vital to work to increase college persistence and completion. In order to increase the percent of residents in Michigan with high quality degrees and credentials we must ensure our students are both accessing and succeeding in postsecondary education at higher rates than the status quo.

Why is this Important?

It is a national imperative that we increase the percentage of people with postsecondary credentials. Currently in Michigan, over one-third of the students who enroll in college are not returning for a second year. Increasing persistence and credit accumulation is necessary to increase postsecondary degree and credential completion and attainment. Michigan must find successful ways to support students while they are in college to ensure that students not only have the opportunity to enroll in college but also to persist through completion.

HOW ARE WE DOING?

Credit Accumulation

The percent of students who persist in college is tracked through MI School Data and calculated as the number of college-enrolled students who accumulate 24 college credits within 16 months of high school graduation. This data includes only Michigan public high school graduates earning at least 24 college credits at an Institution of Higher Education as an undergraduate student. Twenty-four credits are used as the threshold to be consistent with the Common College Metrics from the National Governor's Association. MI School Data provides a wealth of data on Michigan's public school education system that will help make informed educational decisions, help improve instruction and enable school systems to prepare a higher percentage of students to succeed in rigorous high school courses and postsecondary education. The National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) and the Center for Educational Performance and Information (CEPI) collected the data depicted. NSC is a third-party data warehouse that collects enrollment data from over 90% of colleges in the U.S. The measure below presents the percent of students who accumulate 24 college credits within 16 months of high school graduation.

WHAT IT TELLS US:

For graduating class of 2013-2014, 71.9% of high school graduates enrolled in a higher education institution achieved at least 24 credits within 16 months.

This represents a increase of 16.6% from the previous year and an increase of of 9.4% from the baseline.

Source: www.mischooldata.org, data updated on 4/17/17

Goal 6: College Completion

STUDENTS COMPLETING POSTSECONDARY DEGREES AND CREDENTIALS

The United States was once the most well-educated county in the world. Over the past 40 years, the United States has remained stagnant in the percentage of residents with postsecondary degrees or credentials. To meet the demands of the workforce and to regain our prominence as the most well-educated country on the planet, we must dramatically increase the number college graduates each year until 2025.

Why is this important?

In alignment with the rest of the nation, Michigan must work to dramatically increase the percentage of its citizens with high quality credentials and degrees. If Michigan continues on the current path, it is projected that by the year 2025, 43% of Michiganders will have a high quality degree or credential. According to analyses of occupational data and workforce trends, we know that by 2018, 62% of available jobs in Michigan will require education beyond high school.

Between now and 2018, Michigan will need to fill 1.3 million vacancies resulting from job creation, worker retirements, and other factors. Of those vacancies 836,000 will require some sort of postsecondary credential. If we continue on our current path, we are on track to have a postsecondary credential shortfall of 928,506 by the year 2025.

HOW ARE WE DOING?

Community College 6-Year Completion/Graduation/Transfer Rate

This rate represents the percentage of students who successfully completed a degree, earned a certificate or transferred to another institution within six years. Measuring success at the community-college level is complicated. These institutions have diverse missions and student bodies. Students have a wide range of career and academic goals, and more than half are enrolled part time. These factors require a different approach than the methods used for federal reporting requirements. The approach involves a broader definition of success and extends the tracking period to reflect the part-time enrollment of many students.

WHAT IT TELLS US:

In 2014-15, 54% of enrolled students earned an associate degree, earned a certificate, or transferred to another institution within six years.

This represents a small increase of 1.0% from the previous year and an increase of 6% from the baseline.


Public University 6-Year Graduation Rate

The percent of students who complete any formal award within six years or 150% time is tracked through the National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Graduation Rate Survey. The information is calculated by the number of first-time, full-time degree-seeking students who earn a Bachelor's degree, associate degree, or certificate within 150% time.

WHAT IT TELLS US:

In 2013, 60.3% of first-time full-time degree seeking students earned a Bachelor’s degree within 6 year or 150% time.

This represents a decrease of 0.2% from the previous year and an increase of 0.6% from the baseline.


Postsecondary Completion for High School Graduates

The percent of students who complete any formal award (certificate or degree) within six years or 150% time is tracked through the MiSchoolData. The data includes enrollment and awards (certificates, 2-, and 4-year degrees) earned at in-state, out-of-state, and most private/independent colleges and universities. There are no graduate-level enrollment statuses or awards beyond 4-year degrees counted in this report.

Percent of High School Graduates who Complete a Postsecondary Certificate or Degree within 6 Years

WHAT IT TELLS US

For the graduating class of 2009-10, 35.88% of high school graduates completed a certificate or a degree within 6 years of high school graduation.

This represents an increase of 1.27% from the previous year and an increase of 1.59% from the baseline.

Source: Michigan Community College Association, participating colleges self-report data
National Center for Educational Statistics. IPEDS Graduation Rate Survey
MiSchoolData.org - College Progression by Graduating Class

Big Goal

INCREASE THE PERCENT OF MICHIGAN RESIDENTS WITH HIGH QUALITY DEGREES OR CERTIFICATES TO 60% BY THE YEAR 2025

Per capita income and college attainment rates are closely correlated. The educational rates of a state's citizenry are highly and positively correlated to economic prosperity of the state. Michigan's economic future depends on our ability to produce and attract more college graduates to our state.

Why is this important?

National data from the most recent recession and recovery show a net gain of over 2 million jobs for Bachelor's degree holders and above, near zero net change for those with an associate degree or some college, and a net loss of over 5 million jobs for people with a high school diploma or less. Even during the recovery, those with a high school diploma or less have continued to lose jobs while those with a Bachelor's Degree or higher gained. If we can’t supply Michigan's labor market with enough people who have the necessary knowledge and skills, economic growth will be severely constricted.

HOW ARE WE DOING?

Young Adult Degree Attainment

The educational attainment rate is estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey. The percent of Michigan young working-aged adults (25-34) with an associate degree or higher is calculated based on a 5-year data collection estimate from the American Community Survey.

WHAT IT TELLS US:

In 2014, 45.1% of Michigan’s young working-aged adults (25-34) had an associate degree or higher.

This represents an increase of 4.6% from the previous year and an increase of 9.4% from the baseline!

*For years prior to 2014, the graph denotes attainment of associate degrees and higher. For 2014, it also includes the estimated percentage of state residents who have earned high-value postsecondary certificates. This estimate was derived from Census and IPEDS data by labor market experts at the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University.


Adult Degree Attainment

The education attainment rate is estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey. The percent of Michigan working-aged adults (25-64) with an associate degree or higher is calculated based on a 5-year data collection estimate from the American Community Survey.

WHAT IT TELLS US:

In 2015, 43.4% of Michigan’s working-aged adults (25-64) had an associate degree or higher.

This represents an increase of 0.1% from the previous year and an increase of 7.7% from the baseline.

*For years prior to 2014, the graph denotes attainment of associate degrees and higher. For 2014, it also includes the estimated percentage of state residents who have earned high-value postsecondary certificates. This estimate was derived from Census and IPEDS data by labor market experts at the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University.


Source: American Community Survey, 5-year estimates, U.S. Census Bureau, http://factfinder2.census.gov
Lumina Foundation, Annual Stronger Nation Report